Contexts, subtexts and pretexts : literary translation in by Brian James Baer

By Brian James Baer

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Even within the now prodigiously growing field of postcolonial translation studies, a lion’s share of scholarship, from the seminal contributions by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak 2. In the main text of the article, the commonly used English transliterations of Ukrainian and Russian authors’ names are provided; however, in the bibliography, the Library of Congress transliteration is used so that readers may consult library database records. 3 However, when one focuses on translation into a non-hegemonic target language, a whole new set of concerns comes to the fore.

In the main text of the article, the commonly used English transliterations of Ukrainian and Russian authors’ names are provided; however, in the bibliography, the Library of Congress transliteration is used so that readers may consult library database records. 3 However, when one focuses on translation into a non-hegemonic target language, a whole new set of concerns comes to the fore. For non-hegemonic languages in particular, I would argue, the following observation by Gideon Toury rings particularly true: Semiotically .

In the case of “The Tragedy of Central Europe,” the practice of cultural translation can also be seen at the level of the text itself, which has a complex publication history. Originally written in French under the title “Un Occident kidnappé ou la tragédie de l’Europe centrale,” Kundera’s essay first appeared in a Swedish translation in 1983. The French original was published in the journal Le Débat in November of that year. ) It appeared in Granta under the title “A Kidnapped West” and in the New York Review of Books under the title “The Tragedy of Central Europe,” by which the piece became more commonly known.

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